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Spelling Assistance - Speech-to-Text (STT) Software

Speech-to-text software helps students who struggle with spelling by converting spoken words into typed text.

 

Allowable on at least one state assessment Allowable on state assessment: This accommodation is allowable on at least one state assessment. See which tests allow this accommodation

Assistive Technology Assistive Technology (AT): This accommodation includes AT. Be sure AT needs are included as accommodations on the IEP and that the PEIMS code reflects this.

Example:

  • Speech-to-Text as an embedded support on STAAR and STAAR Spanish Online (written compositions)

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    These are examples of free speech-to-text tools that can be used during instruction:

    Enable Dictation in Chromebook's Accessibility Settings

    Google Voice Typing- embedded tool in Google Docs

    Enable Dictation in the iPad's Accessibility Settings

    Enable Dictation on PC/Windows

How to Implement:

  • 1.

    Establish the student's need for spelling support.

    Establish the student's need for spelling support.

  • 2.

    Collaborate with Information Technology/Assistive Technology to get speech-to-text (STT) tools and devices to try.  (Ex: enable dictation/add extension, tablet, Chromebook, laptop/desktop, headset, etc).

    Collaborate with Information Technology/Assistive Technology to get speech-to-text (STT) tools and devices to try.  (Ex: enable dictation/add extension, tablet, Chromebook, laptop/desktop, headset, etc).

  • 3.

    Familiarize yourself with the features of the speech-to-text tool(s). Set up the microphone, adjust/increase the font size, and if needed, ask for training. 

    Familiarize yourself with the features of the speech-to-text tool(s). Set up the microphone, adjust/increase the font size, and if needed, ask for training. 

  • 4.

    Understand the global STT writing process:  Note: To learn the tool and the process, begin with an easy, non-academic/rigorous task with a topic the student

    Understand the global STT writing process: 

    Note: To learn the tool and the process, begin with an easy, non-academic/rigorous task with a topic the student has an interest in, is familiar with, has ideas about…

    1. Plan using graphic organizers, as needed, to organize thoughts. 
    2. Think about your topic and what you want to write. 
      1. Mentally compose your sentence. 
      2. Hold the sentence in memory. 
    3. Practice saying your sentence out loud before turning on the microphone.
    4. Turn on the mic. Avoid touching the mic while using it.
    5. Say your sentence. Speak in full sentences in a clear voice and normal speaking rhythm.
      1. Practice punctuation.
      2. Hint: Try not to look at the screen- watching the computer type what you’re saying is distracting. 
      3. Turn off the microphone. 
    6. Check. Always listen back, checking the accuracy of the speech recognition.
    7. Fix the recognition errors.

    Daniel Cochrane and Kelly Key- Speech Recognition as AT for Writing:  A Guide for K-12 Education, updated 2020.

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  • 5.

    Explain or remind the student of the purpose/the "why" of the accommodation.

    Explain or remind the student of the purpose/the "why" of the accommodation.

  • 6.

    Model the speech-to-text (STT) writing process. ( Plan it. Think it. Say it. Check it. Fix it.)

    Model the speech-to-text (STT) writing process. ( Plan it. Think it. Say it. Check it. Fix it.)

  • 7.

    Initially, teach the student to use speech-to-text by starting with a single sentence. For example,  "I live in a ____ house on a _____ street."

    Initially, teach the student to use speech-to-text by starting with a single sentence. For example,  "I live in a ____ house on a _____ street."

    1. Ask the student to fill in the blanks (ex: " blue house / quiet street.").   
    2. Tell the student the full sentence (ex: " I live in a blue house on a quiet street.").  
    3. Have the student repeat the full sentence (ex: " I live in a blue house on a quiet street.").  
    4. Facilitate turning the microphone on. 
    5. Have the student dictate the sentence (ex: " I live in a blue house on a quiet street.") and turn the mic off.
    6. Read the transcribed sentence to the student or demonstrate the use of text-to-speech, listening for mistakes. 
    7. Coach enunciation, giving the student feedback as the same sentence is repeated, until the sentence is correct. (Ex: "I live in a new mouse on a riot street."/ "I live in a blue house on a riot street."/ "I live in a blue house on a quiet street." Feedback might include having good posture, move the microphone closer, use a study carrell, or speak more clearly, etc.)
    8. Continue with modeling and coaching student to dictate several student-generated sentences,(preferably on a high interest or familiar topic)... simple paragraphs and so on as described in "Speech Recognition as AT for Writing:  A Guide for K-12 Education"

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  • 8.

    Provide guided practice as the student uses speech-to-text to write paragraphs with grade-appropriate vocabulary and grammar. Provide a speech-to-text checklist/a visual reminder of the steps. 

    Provide guided practice as the student uses speech-to-text to write paragraphs with grade-appropriate vocabulary and grammar. Provide a speech-to-text checklist/a visual reminder of the steps. 

  • 9.

    Decide which assignments (those with sufficient composing demands/those where a quiet environment is available) the student will use speech-to-text.

    Decide which assignments (those with sufficient composing demands/those where a quiet environment is available) the student will use speech-to-text.

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  • 10.

    Once the student has shown a basic level of competency with the tool(s), allow the student to use it independently during instruction on relevant

    Once the student has shown a basic level of competency with the tool(s), allow the student to use it independently during instruction on relevant assignments. A student needs time to reach a recognition accuracy rate of 90% with STT in order to not get bogged down with the correction procedures.

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  • 11.

    Acknowledge and reinforce when a student chooses to use the accommodation/assistive technology!

    Acknowledge and reinforce when a student chooses to use the accommodation/assistive technology!

  • 12.

    Develop a routine for how/where technologies will be distributed and collected.

    Develop a routine for how/where technologies will be distributed and collected.

  • 13.

    Monitor and record the student’s progress and satisfaction with the accommodation.

    Monitor and record the student’s progress and satisfaction with the accommodation.

  • 14.

    Share progress and effectiveness with the student, the educational team, and the family.

    Share progress and effectiveness with the student, the educational team, and the family.

  •  

Review the TEA policy document for details about allowable use of spelling assistance during test administration. 

Review the TEA Technology Guidelines to ensure any device or software is appropriate for state assessment use.

Visit the 2020-2021 Technology Guidelines for Spelling to maintain the security and validity of the assessment.to maintain the security and validity of the assessment.

State Assessment
Allowability

Some accommodations appropriate for instructional use may not be allowable on a statewide assessment. Select the state assessment to view the implementation policies.

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Type: Designated Support 

Assessments: 

  • STAAR grades 4 and 7 writing, English I, English II, and English III (written composition ONLY)
  • STAAR Spanish grade 4 writing (written composition ONLY)

Student Eligibility Criteria: 

  • receives Section 504 or special education services,
  • routinely, independently, and effectively uses it during classroom instruction and classroom testing, and
  • is capable of organizing and developing ideas and understands the basic function and use of written language conventions (e.g., sentence structures, irregular verbs) but has a disability that is so severe that he or she cannot apply basic spelling rules or word patterns (e.g., silent letters, base words with affixes) to written responses.

same as STAAR

same as STAAR

Grade 4 writing (written composition ONLY)

same as STAAR

Grade 4 writing (written composition ONLY)